Drypoints
by Albrecht DÜRER

The copper plates were too soft to permit repeated printing without a weakening of the finer lines. Therefore, after the interruption occasioned by his second sojourn beyond the Alps, Dürer began experimentation with drypoint (1512). The result did not please him as it pleases his present-day admirers, and after only three experiments, therefore, Dürer ceased to work in this medium. He continued to search for new ways to achieve his ends.

Preview Picture Data File Info Comment
Head of a Young Man
1503
Metalpoint and pen and brown ink on gray prepared paper, 223 x 181 mm
Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown

659*800
True Color
175 Kb



The Holy Family
1513
Drypoint, 210 x 181 mm
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

700*800
True Color
178 Kb



The Holy Family with St John, The Magdalen and Nicodemus
c. 1512
Drypoint, 216 x 190 mm
Staatliche Museen, Berlin

750*879
Grayscale
113 Kb



St Jerome by the Pollard Willow
1512
Drypoint, 208 x 185 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

750*899
Grayscale
133 Kb



Man of Sorrows with Hands Bound
1512
Drypoint, 117 x 75 mm
Graphische Sammlung Albertina, Vienna

550*853
Grayscale
81 Kb




Summary of graphic works by Albrecht Dürer
drawings | woodcuts | engravings
etchings | drypoints | watercolours |
paintings