CHALGRIN, Jean-François-Thérese
(b. 1739, Paris, d. 1811, Paris)

Biography

French architect. He studied architecture with Giovanni Niccolò Servandoni (1695-1766), Étienne Louis Boullée and Pierre Louis Moreau-Desproux (1727 or 1736-1793). He took the Academy of Architecture's Grand Prix de Rome in 1758 at age 19, traveled to Rome the following year, and returned to France in 1763. His patrons included the Count de Saint-Florentin, for whose mistress Chalgrin built a house on the Champs-Élysées that was subsequently leased by Thomas Jefferson during the years that he served as U.S. minister to the French government.

Chalgrin participated in the reintroduction of the basilican style of church architecture. His Saint-Philippe-du-Roule (designed 1768) was the main church of this type in Paris. Prominent features of the interior are twin rows of columns, extending down the sides of the nave and around the periphery of the apse, that support a coffered barrel-vault ceiling. The structure is characterized by an essential simplicity of design that was in stark contrast to the complex interiors of existing Gothic and Renaissance churches.

Following the marriage of the count de Provence (later Louis XVIII), Chalgrin became first architect to his household (1775) and designed for the countess the Pavillon de Musique at Versailles, which still survives. At this time he also helped to complete the Church of Saint-Sulpice. Under the Directory Chalgrin was commissioned to transform the Luxembourg Palace into a government building. The salle des séances that he built now serves as the hall of the French Senate. Chalgrin's final project, which he did not live to see completed, was the famous Arc de Triomphe in Paris, begun in 1806 to commemorate Napoléon's victorious battles.

Chalgrin was elected to the Académie royale d'architecture (France) in 1770. He succeeded Charles de Wailly in the Institut de France in 1798.



© Web Gallery of Art, created by Emil Krén and Daniel Marx.