SCARPAGNINO
(b. ca. 1465, Grosio, d. 1549, Venezia)

Biography

Antonio di Pietro Abbondi, known as Scarpagnino, Italian architect. He was active in Venice from October 1505, when he was appointed as a mason by the Salt Office (in effect the Venetian Board of Works). His first assignment was to take over the rebuilding of the Fondaco dei Tedeschi (which had been damaged by fire) from Giorgio Spavento; his work there does not seem, however, to have had a substantial influence on the appearance of the structure, which was inspired by Fra Giaconolo. In 1507 he was apparently involved in building San Sebastiano and Santo Spirito on the Giudecca. He restored the Rialto Bridge, already restored by Giorgio Spavento.

After a fire destroyed many buildings in the Rialto on 10 January 1514, he played a role in the reconstruction, competing with Alessandro Leopardi, Giovanni Celeste, and Fra Giovanni Giocondo. The most important building that burned was the church of San Giovanni Elemosinario. The reconstruction of the entire area was then entrusted to the Scarpagnino, who also designed the reconstruction of the church in Renaissance style. The reconstruction of the church was completed around 1531 and it was soon adorned with works by the greatest artists of the period, such as Titian, Palma Giovane, and Pordenone. In addition to the church, an important part of the project was the Palazzo dei Dieci Savi, intended to be the seat of one of the most important magistrates of Venice.

In 1520 Scarpagnino and Francesco Lurano finished the restoration of the Ponte Pietra in Verona. From 1527 Scarpagnino was among the members of the Confraternity of the Scuola Grande di San Marco in Venice, for which he executed the model for the high altar of the Sala Superiore.

In 1534 he worked at the Scuola Grande di San Rocco, for which he designed the new staircase. He worked at the Palazzo Contarini delle Figure, then to the design and construction of the Church of Santa Maria Zobenigo. He also worked at the Palazzo Ducale in Venice.

His son Marco was a stonemason with whom he often collaborated.



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