Architecture
by Pietro da CORTONA

In combining architecture, painting, and sculpture to act on viewers' emotions, Pietro da Cortona was the quintessential practitioner of the High Baroque style. Painter, architect, and sculpture designer, the energetic Pietro always worked simultaneously on architectural and decorative projects. His dignified yet festive combination of paint and stucco became Europe's official decorative style for aristocratic dwellings. Pietro da Cortona once wrote that architecture was only a pastime for him, but he was second only to Gian Lorenzo Bernini among seventeenth-century Roman architects. His finest building, SS. Martina e Luca, typifies the High Baroque in its interplay of light and shadow through convex and concave forms.

Preview Picture Data Info
Exterior view
1635-50
Photo
Santi Luca e Martina, Rome


Exterior view
1635-50
Photo
Santi Luca e Martina, Rome


Exterior view
1635-50
Photo
Santi Luca e Martina, Rome


Exterior view
1635-50
Photo
Santi Luca e Martina, Rome


Exterior view
1635-50
Photo
Santi Luca e Martina, Rome


Interior view
1635-50
Photo
Santi Luca e Martina, Rome


Interior view
1635-50
Photo
Santi Luca e Martina, Rome


Interior view
1635-50
Photo
Santi Luca e Martina, Rome


Exterior view
1656-57
Photo
Santa Maria della Pace, Rome


Exterior view
1656-57
Photo
Santa Maria della Pace, Rome


View of the piazza
1656-57
Etching
Biblioteca Apostolica, Vatican


Proposal for the Eastern Façade of the Louvre
1664-65
Pen, brown ink, and wash
Musée du Louvre, Paris


General view
begun 1668
Photo
San Carlo al Corso, Rome


Exterior view
1658-62
Photo
Santa Maria in Via Lata, Rome


Exterior view
1658-62
Photo
Santa Maria in Via Lata, Rome


Interior view
1658-62
Photo
Santa Maria in Via Lata, Rome


Interior view
1658-62
Photo
Santa Maria in Via Lata, Rome





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