Architecture
by RAFFAELLO

By 1514, Raphael had achieved fame for his work at the Vatican and was able to hire a crew of assistants to help him finish painting frescoes in the Stanza dell'Incendio, freeing him up to focus on other projects. While Raphael continued to accept commissions - including portraits of popes Julius II and Leo X - and his largest painting on canvas, The Transfiguration (commissioned in 1517), he had by this time begun to work on architecture. After architect Donato Bramante died in 1514, the pope hired Raphael as his chief architect. Under this appointment, Raphael created the design for a chapel in Sant'Eligio degli Orefici. He also designed the Chigi Chapel in Rome's Santa Maria del Popolo and an area within Saint Peter's new basilica.

Raphael's architectural work was not limited to religious buildings. It also extended to designing palaces. Raphael's architecture honored the classical sensibilities of his predecessor, Donato Bramante, and incorporated his use of ornamental details. Such details would come to define the architectural style of the late Renaissance and early Baroque periods.

Preview Picture Data Info
Exterior view
begun 1518
Photo
Villa Madama, Rome


General view
begun 1518
Photo
Villa Madama, Rome





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